Welcome to Our Hearing Technology Page
Last Modified Sunday, November 30, 2014


Hearing Technology
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Click Here to Visit HearingMojo.com

  • HearingMojo.com

    • Hearing impairment caused by Meniere's Disease and possible hearing assistance through hearing aids, cochlear implants, and the like, are, in our opinion, widely underreported aspects of Meniere's Disease.  We have added this Hearing Technology Page, on which we direct visitors to Meniere's Disease patient David Copithorne's excellent coverage of this subject at his website HearingMojo.com.  Visit HearingMojo.com for the latest in hearing technology news and reviews, including hearing aids, cochlear implants, tax policy, and other leading edge issues.  (This is news, not advertising, and we receive no compensation for listing this excellent site.)

  • Basic hearing aid information for Meniere's Disease patients.

    • Hearing aids help some but not all Meniere's Disease patients. One thing to keep in mind is to tell your hearing aid dispenser that your hearing loss is due to Meniere's Disease and the extent to which your hearing fluctuates. Hearing aids vary from simple, relatively inexpensive analog devices to complex, programmable, digital, high-tech, expensive devices.

    • Generally speaking, there are two kinds of hearing loss: conductive and sensorineural.

      • Conductive hearing loss results from an impaired sound pathway from the outer ear to the inner ear.

      • Sensorineural hearing loss results from impairment of the auditory branch of the vestibulocochlear (8th cranial) nerve.

      • Hearing loss from Meniere's Disease results from destruction of the hair cells on the end of the auditory branch in the inner ear. The sound reaches the inner ear, but there are no hair cells to receive them and to transmit them to the brain.  Therefore, hearing loss from Meniere's Disease is sensorineural.  See Dr. Timothy Hain's information here.

    • We think that the only way to figure out whether a hearing aid will help any particular person is for that person to get one and try it out.

      • Fortunately, most U.S. states have laws that provide for a trial period, during which one can get all or most of the cost of the hearing aid returned.

      • However, professional fees of doctors and audiologists are generally not refundable.

    • Click here for information from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

    • Click here for information from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

    • Click here for information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Copyright © 1997-2014 Meniere's Disease Information Center.  All rights are reserved.
All copying, including (but not limited to) websites, bulletin boards, forums, and blogs, is prohibited.
Click here for more copyright information.